Age equation radiometric dating

11-Apr-2020 20:47 by 9 Comments

Age equation radiometric dating - gigi lai dating

This clock representation shows some of the major units of geological time and definitive events of Earth history.

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The three million year Quaternary period, the time of recognizable humans, is too small to be visible at this scale.

Corresponding to eons, eras, periods, epochs and ages, the terms "eonothem", "erathem", "system", "series", "stage" are used to refer to the layers of rock that belong to these stretches of geologic time in Earth's history.

Geologists qualify these units as "early", "mid", and "late" when referring to time, and "lower", "middle", and "upper" when referring to the corresponding rocks.

The existence, timing, and terrestrial effects of the Late Heavy Bombardment is still debated.

In Ancient Greece, Aristotle (384-322 BCE) observed that fossils of seashells in rocks resembled those found on beaches – he inferred that the fossils in rocks were formed by living animals, and he reasoned that the positions of land and sea had changed over long periods of time.

Apart from the Late Heavy Bombardment, events on other planets probably had little direct influence on the Earth, and events on Earth had correspondingly little effect on those planets.

Construction of a time scale that links the planets is, therefore, of only limited relevance to the Earth's time scale, except in a Solar System context.

Therefore, the second timeline shows an expanded view of the most recent eon.

In a similar way, the most recent era is expanded in the third timeline, and the most recent period is expanded in the fourth timeline.

The geology or deep time of Earth's past has been organized into various units according to events which took place.

Different spans of time on the GTS are usually marked by corresponding changes in the composition of strata which indicate major geological or paleontological events, such as mass extinctions.

Geologic units from the same time but different parts of the world often look different and contain different fossils, so the same time-span was historically given different names in different locales.